Black History Month.com

April 2021

1804 | 1965 | 1863 | 1886 | 1929 | 1948

Martin Luther King, Jr. Assassinated

Memphis, Tennessee - The recognized leader of the Black Rights (Civil Rights) movement of the 1960s was murdered at the Lorraine Hotel, on a Thursday, at 6:01 P.M.

Joseph Louw, a 28 year-old South African, took the photograph just before the murder. Some suspect Louw was there working with the FBI and CIA as surveillance of the Black Rights (civil rights) leader.

Abraham Lincoln Assassinated

Washingotn, D. C. - Known as the greatest President in United States history for apparent victory in the American Slavery War (Civil War) and the halt of chattel slavery. Abraham Lincoln was murdered by a pro-slavery supporter as he watched a play in Ford's Theatre. He was shot to death from behind.

2015 Baltimore Protests

Baltimore, Maryland - A local protest began Saturday, April 18th, because of the Sunday, April 12th arrest of 25 year-old Freddie Gray, for possession of a knife. The protests began outside the Western district police station, in Baltimore.

The following day, Freddie Gray was murdered, while in police custody, on Sunday, April 19th. It was the day after the protests began. For the next 2 weeks, the protests intensified and became violent. Eventually, the Maryland National Guard would take the streets of Baltimore.

There were hundreds of injuries, arrests, fires, and some businesses were looted. The city of Baltimore imposed a curfew and some parts of Baltimore were effectively shutdown during this period.

6 employees of the Baltimore Police Department were arrested. 3 were tried and found not guilty. Charges were dropped against the other 3.

No one was held criminally responsible for the murder of Freddie Gray, while in the custody of the police of the City of Baltimore.

Columbine High School Massacre

Columbine, Colorado - The greatest high school mass murder was committed by Eric Harris, and Dylan Klebold. The two white male murderers sought to murder all the black American students at the school and other classmates.

Rodney King Uprisings

Los Angeles, California - At 1 P.M., P.S.T., Monday, April 29th, Judge Stanley Weisberg announced the not guilty verdict, in the Rodney King case. Four white male police employees, of the Los Angeles Police Department, escaped punishment for their brutal beating of the black man, Rodney King, because of the all white jury.

As a result, by 4. P.M., civil disturbances erupted in parts of Los Angeles. By 5 P.M., these disturbances exploded into what became known as the Rodney King riots.

This period of civil unrest lasted until May 4th, with 63 people killed.

Louisiana Purchase Agreement Signed

Paris, France - This agreement, transferred the claims of Napoleon and the French government to the United States, permanently. Napoleon lacked the military might to secure the area and the United States wanted it to expand the enslavement of black Americans for commercial gain.

Once signed and the document arrived in Washington, D. C. (July 14, 1803), the Mississippi Valley area was opened to the enslavement of black Americans, by the United States government. While it did not secure the land for forced labor (chattel slavery), the European (white) powers never challenged the United States' claim to the land.

The agreement never recognized the claims of non-whites that already lived in the area (namely the original inhabitants). It also greatly expanded the internal slave trade, and the complete exploitation of black American labor for the commercial profit of white Americans, in the United States.